Civil Mediation

A skilled mediator can help you reach an amicable, confidential, cost-effective resolution to a dispute far more quickly than other means, often without having to go to court. Using a barrister mediator as an independent third party to help you negotiate a settlement can enable a binding agreement to be reached whilst also maintaining the relationship between you and any other parties. Mediation can take place before court proceedings have begun, or indeed afterwards.

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Mediation is confidential, and has a very high success rate. A settlement reached via mutual agreement is more likely to be adhered to by both parties than one imposed by the court, and the resolution can be reached much sooner.

If a resolution cannot be reached and court proceedings follow, the issues involved are likely to have been narrowed, and the confidential nature of mediation means the Judge cannot be informed of what was discussed in mediation. Mediation rarely takes longer than one day, and often less than that, depending on the nature of the dispute.

Becket Chambers offers barristers who are able to mediate civil and commercial disputes of all types and sizes. The mediation can take place at our offices, where we can provide private meeting rooms, or at a suitable location of your choice.

Our mediators are experienced at dealing with all types of civil or commercial matters, including contract disputes, wills and probate matters, property and housing disputes, neighbour and boundary issues, personal injury, professional negligence and business/company disputes.

Civil Mediation can help you to resolve disputes such as:

  • Property disputes – for example if you have a disagreement over whether you or someone else has an interest in a property
  • Consumer – for example if you have a disagreement over something you have purchased
  • Contract disputes – for example between two businesses or a landlord and tenant
  • Neighbourhood disputes – for example if you have a problem with a neighbour over a boundary, or excess noise
  • Workplace – for example if you feel you have been unfairly treated at work, or if you are an employer who needs to resolve a problem with an employee
  • Inheritance – where you and/or other family members wish to challenge the terms of a deceased relative’s Will.